Angular 4.2, TypeScript 2.4, Amazon AWS, Node / Webpack Updates, & .NET Core Tutorials

Hello,

This is Meligy from GuruStop.NET, and this is a special letter celebrating Angular 4.2… Actually, Angular 4.2.1 already!

Let’s see what good content I have found on the Internet since last letter, that you should find super useful as well. Of course it’s not just going to be about Angular, but also AWS, Node, .NET Core, and more…

Angular Releases

Angular 4.2

As mentioned, Angular 4.2 is here already. In addition to the Changelog which describes what’s new in every new beta/final build, here’s also a good write up on the release highlights.

Reading through the post, I think the most exciting features for me are the new fake async helpers for tests, allowing to test async code while not having to wait for real setTimeout() calls, etc, which helps tests run faster! There’re also enhancements for animations, and more features relying on TypeScript 2.3+ strict features.

ng-sydney

The Angular usergroup I run in Sydney is experimenting with recording sessions simply by using a mobile phone. While there’s a lot of room for improvements, this approach allowed capturing some very good content. Like a session about Angular 4 from an official Angular team member in April, and these sessions from May:

Amazon AWS Getting Started

[Video] Create Your Personal Website with Angular & Deploy to Amazon AWS

If you are like me, you might have heard several people talk about AWS.

Everything is going to the cloud, and Amazon is the biggest player in this field. But how do you get started? What would you build in the first place? Would you use Angular for it? And once it’s ready, how do you get it to the cloud?

Well, that’s exactly what this video talks about!

The speaker’s challenge was quite the opposite. She is fairly comfortable with AWS, and still learning Angular. So, she decided to build herself a new personal website to show her work and more. She used Angular and the Angular CLI, and of course she deployed it to AWS.

In the video, she explains why this is a good idea you should try too, and goes through all the different options that make sense for getting started, with demos covering both Amazon CLI tools and UI console.

She also wrote a very good tutorial on how to do it, with a lot of links to learn about specific topics. Highly recommended.

I’m referring to it myself to learn this stuff.

Angular Modules & Lazy Loading

[Video] Angular Modules, Lazy Loading, & Analysing Your Bundle Content

In this video by Aliaksei Kuncevic, an Angular expert, and a frequent ng-sydney attendee and speaker, we go into the lesser known official Angular guidance around Core Modules, Feature Modules, and structuring your real world Angular projects.

It covers even less known tools that help you analyse the size of the JS files that tools like Webpack etc generate, to see what JS modules take up the most space and make them big. He shows some interesting cases with RxJS, lodash, momentJS, and other libraries.

Aliaksei also made both the talk slides and demo sources available for download.

You might also want to check my earlier very quick blog post on shared modules.

TypeScript Releases

TypeScript 2.4

While still a pre-release version, which you can npm install as typescript@next, TypeScript 2.4 is already some awesome features that I’d love to mention here. Also it doesn’t seem to pose any breaking changes that prevent you from experimenting with it in your Angular 4+ projects (which officially support TypeScript 2.3 already).

The first feature, as explained in wiki, is native support for lazy-loaded imports, which promises to make lazy loading much easier in future applications (although will probably need to wait for tools like Webpack to support fully).

This is going to be a big deal soon I hope, as now people often rely on complex solutions for lazy loading that’s often encapsulated by routing tools (like Angular CLI routing support) because it’s just too much.

There’s also better type inference all over the place. That’s something you can take advantage of today, and it basically means less places where you don’t have to specify the types manually thinking “Grr.. the compiler should’ve known that by itself already”, and still get proper typing support.

If you are not familiar with what’s new in TypeScript 2.3 itself, or other earlier versions, check the same wiki page, What’s new in TypeScript, which explains almost all the TypeScript features as of the versions they were added to the language, and also explain what real world scenario tempted the team to add each feature, and how you case use it for your own uses.

Node & Build Tools

Node 8 & Canary

In case you missed the news, Node 8 is a final release now. This is an important update mainly because it’s an even number release, which in Node ecosystem means after a few more minor versions, it’ll become the next Long Term Support “LTS” release, most suitable for production apps (Node 8.1 is already out!).

It also includes some performance improvements, and new APIs. Although most of the new APIs are low level ones, this means that as native modules etc start relying on them, more and more tools will require moving to Node 8. Luckily, it doesn’t seem to break anything noticeable if you are already using Node 6.

And in other news, there’s also a Node Canary release channel, which uses the most bleeding edge version of Chrome’s V8 engine!

NPM 5

With Node 8, we also get NPM 5. The release seems to be heavily influenced by alternative NPM client, Yarn.

The biggest feature of the release IMO is much faster package installs (comparable to Yarn), Using --save by default (like, err, Yarn), and better npm link workflows for open source developers (not the same as Yarn, but this area is not ideal with all current tools anyway, and only affects those who play with non releases open source tools).

And yes, no surprises, should be a straightforward update from NPM 4, with a single exception that you’ll NPM local package cache will be cleared, but the speed of installs should make up for that anyway.

Webpack 3

Although not final yet, Webpack 3 seems to be moving fast. For the vast majority of us, it’s going to be a mostly backwards compatible version with Webpack 2 that gives us free performance and saves all the time we spend waiting for the build to finish!

For plugin creators, there might be a bit more fiddling. If you are using the Angular CLI, they arealready working on a version that works with Webpack 3.

.NET [Core]

.NET Fringe Conference Videos

One thing to love about .NET is that no matter what time of the year it is, there’s always some good .NET conference going on! This time it’s .NET Fringe.

[Video List]: .NET Fringe 2017 Conference Videos

The conference took place a few days ago, and the videos area already available. There’re many good topics like this and this on Open Source in .NET, this on what on earth does .NET Standard mean, this on whether Mono is dead, this on DotNetCoreKoans C# exercises, this about the A Wider .NET initiative, and a lot more.

And of course it wouldn’t be a recent .NET conference without talks about Docker and F#!

There are many lightning talks as well. They don’t have the titles in the YouTube list for these unfortunately, but the entire channel is worth browsing.

Other Worthy Content

[Article] MSDN Blogs: Performance Improvements in .NET Core
Performance is obviously a big thing in .NET Core, and this details some of the specifics.

[Opinion] The Coming .NET Renaissance
While there’s some crazy fun with .NET Core versioning and tutorials and all, it seems to be all for the good. Or is it?

[Article] Scott Hanselman: .NET and Docker
A lot of the docker tutorials around .NET focus on Visual Studio integration etc. This one covers a wider view, including realistic production workflows.

Gotta Stop Here…

Alright, there’re many more things I’d like to share with you here, but then the email would go forever, and a lot of the really good things here would be lost. So, gotta stop somewhere.

Feel free to reply directly to this email and tell me which resource you liked the most, and what topics you’d rather I mention or reference more info about in the next letter to make it more useful for you.

Until then!

Cheers,

Angular 4.0 Final Is … Here! And Angular CLI 1.0 Is Final Too!!

Update (March 24)

Angular 4 Final Is Out Already

Check out the official announcement, and github changelog.
After that, check the updated documentation for Angular 4 at angular.io.
If you need access to Angular 2 docs, check the black-and-white official docs archive at v2.angular.io.

Update 2

And, on the same day, just as mentioned earlier in the post below…

Angular CLI 1.0 Final IS Out Too

Checkout the changelog, README / Docs.
And if you ever used Angular CLI before v1.0 final, check the official upgrade guide.

Hello, This is Meligy from GuruStop.NET.
Good news, we are expecting Angular 4 final any hour now!

How Do We Know?

During the ng-sydney Angular meetup gathering last Wednesday, Stephen Fluin from the Angular team repeated a couple of times that Angular 4 final is expected this week.

A quick look into the latest Angular team meeting notes also confirms that Angular 4 is due on Thursday, March 22 (although they mentioned there are a couple blocking issues, so, it might be on Friday or so).

Angular CLI, the best tool to create, develop, and test Angular applications, is also going to be released as 1.0.0 final alongside Angular 4.

P.S.
If you prefer to add server-side rendering, you might check Angular Universal fork of the CLI fork for Node, and `dotnet new Angular` for ASP .NET Core. If you need to build an Ionic app, check Ionic CLI 3 beta. They all would come with Angular 2 support by default only though, while the official Angular CLI supports generating Angular 4 projects by running `ng new app-name –ng4`.

[Video] Angular 4 And The Angular CLI

If you want to learn more about Angular 4 and the Angular CLI, see Stephen Fluin`s video here:

[Video Playlist] More Recent Talks, NG-NL

If you are interested in more free up-to-date Angular videos, the NG-NL Angular Netherlands conference also took place last week, and many session videos are available now in this YouTube playlist:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQi8NNYCH8TDFnOhjrIsjZGMD6Ks8SQid

Angular 4? (Not 3!!)

Just for those who don’t know, the reason there is no Angular 3 is that the Angular router for Angular 2 has been rewritten 3 times, and the NPM package for Angular router is now 3.x, while all other Angular packages are 2.x.

To make all the packages the same version again, the Angular team skipped version 3 entirely, and jumped directly to version 4.

It’s worth reminding though that Angular 4 is mostly backwards compatible with Angular 2. You should expect most if not all your applications to continue to work with it.

And a final reminder, it’s “Angular”, for Angular 2+, and “AngularJS” for Angular 1.x. These are the names that the Angular team prefers, and that’s what you’ll see me use more often going forward.

What’s Next?

Once Angular 4 final is out, I’ll send you a follow up email, with a very customized writeup of what I personally find most exciting about Angular 4, and can’t wait to use in all my production projects.

I’ll also share some awesome resources for RxJS and TypeScript.

Stay tuned!

Cheers,

– –

Meligy

ng-sydney | Usergroup Founder & Organizer

Angular 4 Beta is out 🔥 Everything you want to know!

Hello there,
Have you heard the news? Angular 4 beta is here!

Yes, Angular 4!

Update: December 15, 2016

Angular 4 Betas have started coming out already.

Check out out from here.

This post started on December 12, 2016, and has been actively updated since.
Each update has its date marked.

Have I managed to make you panic yet?
Hopefully not. You might be raising questions already still, like:

What about Angular 3?

There won’t be any Angular 3. Right now the Angular Router version is using the 3.x space already, and is not in sync with the rest of Angular, which is still at 2.x.

So, the easiest way to bring them back in sync is to skip v3, and jump directly to v4.

Angular 4? Another Big Bang Release?

Not really:

Angular 4 will be released in March 2017. The first beta will ship in December (sometime this week as mentioned above). The intention is to release a new major version every 6 months.

Each new version is allowed to mark APIs from the last previous major version as deprecated, but NOT to break them. So:

  • Angular 4 might deprecate APIs from Angular 2, but not break them
  • Angular 5 might only deprecate APIs from Angular 4, but not break them (might break APIs from Angular 2 though)

The team has confirmed that Angular 4 will be a backwards compatible upgrade from Angular 2. You might expect a few deprecations at worst (until now that’s none BTW). But no API change / breakage.

So, what is Angular 2 and Angular 4 called now?

The team says: Just call it “Angular”. This should be more future proof.

Given Angular 4 is a backwards compatible upgrade, people searching for solutions to issues, etc., might find an Angular 2 answer, and that answers should just work with their Angular 4 app.

How about Angular 1?

Someone asked me on Twitter: “How would I avoid Angular 1 results showing up for my search then?”. I think the closest thing is adding “-angularJS” to your search (or “NOT angularJS”, without quotes in both). Angular 1 articles tend to use this way more than Angular 2 ones.

When was that announced?

There was a new Angular conference in Belgium last week. During that, the team made the Angular 4 announcement in the keynote.

Watch the full video from here

The conference team did not announce anything about releasing more videos, but when I asked them they confirmed that they’ll be available soon.

Update: December 12, 2016

The information has also surfaced in the official Angular team meeting for December 4:

Update: December 14, 2016

The team has also created an official blog post about Angular 4:
Ok… let me explain: it’s going to be Angular 4

How about … ?

If you have any more questions, just reply to this email. If I know the answers, I send it to you right away. If I don’t, I’ll do my best ti find it and send it to you.

Until next time!

Cheers,

– –

Meligy

Readify | Senior Software Consultant
ng-sydney | Usergroup Founder & Organizer

Email: eng.meligy@gmail.com
Mobile: +61 451 835006
Twitter | Blog | Linkedin | StackOverflow

 

P.S.

If you are in NSW Australia, the ng-sydney usergroup is holding its December gathering on Wednesday this week:

Check it out from here

If you noticed, it’ll be on December 14. This is the same day to expect Angular 4 beta 0 — how exciting!

AngularConnect Videos & Free Angular 2 Router Book (Only for a few hours)

Hello,
This is Meligy from gurustop.net. I wanted to send you a very quick email to let you know about Angular 2 conference that took place in the last couple of days, Angular Connect.

The videos for the conference are already available on YouTube.

Check them out from here:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzrskTiT_ObAk3xBkVxMz5g

There are videos for each whole-day track of the 2 tracks 2 day conference.
There are also videos for each session starting to come out. Seems all Day 1 is there, and Day 2 coming eventually.

For browsing through the whole-day videos, you can use the schedule page as guide, or just watch the individual session videos as they come out.

The sessions page on the site has all the separate videos that came out, and all the slides that are announced on Twitter, etc.

Another option is wait for the next message from me, as I’ll email you later all the most important summaries from the conference and what I think is must-watch.

Until then!


Meligy
gurustop.net
ng-sydney
Twitter | LinkedIn | StackOverflow

P.S.

This tweet was posted about 12 hours ago:

Victor is from the Angular Router team, and he writes the best Angular tutorials on
vsavkin.com.

Obviously this is only for less than 12 hours now, so get it quick.

Angular 2 final is released, here’s what you need to know

Update

The official release announcement is now out, with notes about future semantic versioning.

P. S. Sorry for spamming today with many emails. It won’t be the usual rate for these emails. I promise.

Hey,
Earlier today I sent you an email, saying that there’s a special Angular 2 event, where I expected the team to tell us when they are going to release Angular 2 final. I thought it would be too optimistic to ask for Angular 2 final today, but at least get a date!

I was wrong!

Watch the event stream, from the time 4:49s:
youtube.com/watch?v=xTIWBXkpvDc&t=4m49s

Yes, Angular 2 final is here. and it’s pretty much RC 7. No breaking changes :)
See the changelog as always.

Well, that’s it really. The NPM packages are updates, you just change the RC versions from 2.0.0-rc.7 to 2.0.0, and voila!

What About Angular1?

It will continue to be supported as long as the team sees a lot of usage (which they judge by how many people check the docs, now over a million people, 3 or 4 times Angular 2).

Most of the new minor features will be to make it more like Angular 2 though, and easier to migrate.

The Future

So, what comes after Angular 2 you ask?

Many small improvements that limit breaking changes, many more frequent releases to come without breaking your stuff.

One thing the team said is that they are not done making Angular faster yet, or smaller. They also said they really want to make the reactive / stream story amazing, and I’m guessing there’s still more work in the router space.

Then every 6 months or so (that’s February next year for the next one), a big release with breaking changes and semantic versioning, the next breaking-changes release, it will be Angular 3.

Most likely we’ll get the automatic project upgrade tool that the Angular team uses for automatic upgrades inside Google as well. The team said it should be by the time Angular 3 is out.

Very exciting, go check the whole special event video yourself!

I’ll be checking for more Angular2+ goodness, and emailing you with my findings as always.

Cheers,


Meligy
gurustop.net
ng-sydney
Twitter | LinkedIn | StackOverflow

Expecting Some Big News From The Angular 2 Team Today

Update 2:

Angular 2 final is here already!
Read my follow-up post here

 

Update 1:

Here’s the direct link to the livestream:
youtube.com/user/angularjs/live

The same YouTube channel will have the recording if you are checking this later.

Hello,
This is Meligy from gurustop.net. I thought I’d drop you a quick note to let you know that the Angular 2 team are having a local meetup in the mountain area in the U.S. later today, and they are saying it’s going to be a very special one.
It’s even titled Special Event!

What’s going to happen? Are they going to release Angular 2 Final?
That’s unlikely. But they might announce the release date!
Will it be in Angular Connect this month, or ng-europe next month?
I can’t wait to know!!

Well, the meetup is going to be streamed anyway. And it’s going to be in very convenient times for those living in the U.S. or Australia especially.

The talk will start at 7 PM PST, which is 12 PM East Australia Time, so you can watch in the evening, or during the lunch break, depending on where you are in the world!

Just check the Angular twitter account 10 minutes or so before the show start.
They should post the livestream link around then.

If you are into twitter, you can send them questions using the hashtag #ashng, but if you aren’t, you can just check the twitter page (no account needed) only for the streaming link.

In other news…

If you haven’t heard already, Angular 2 RC 7 has been released earlier this week.

The changelog shows only RXJS and Zone library upgrades, and a fix for lazy loading in the router when using Webpack.

Lazy loading is an interesting piece when it comes to play with NgModules and AOT compiler. Here are some great slides about what the Angular compiler does. We need to dedicate more time to the topic still.

If you want to take advantage of the fix, it should be a matter of upgrading your packages and nothing else. The team are keeping their promise to limit the breaking changes after RC 5 deprecations, and this is awesome!

Here’s how Angular-CLI upgrade commit looks like for example. Only package.json changes. Nothing else.

Speaking of the CLI, they also released a new version yesterday. You should check it out. The changelog tells you what’s new, but you can also directly check the commit log.

It should be a matter of npm i angular-cli@webpack. There’s now less need to work with the CLI from Github directly, but that’s how I personally tested the release yesterday even before it came out. I’m rewriting my guide on how to do it. Stay tuned!

That’s it!

Watch the meetup either streamed or recorded, or don’t worry about it as I’ll always keep you updated with any big news.

Until next one,

Cheers,


Meligy
gurustop.net
ng-sydney
Twitter | LinkedIn | StackOverflow

Learning Angular 2 recent RCs and future release plans

Hello there,
This is Meligy from gurustop.net. Today we are going to talk about the new things happening in the Angular 2 world.

Angular 2 RC 5 has been released a few days ago, and RC 6 is going to be out in a week or two. RC 6 will be mostly removing deprecated features. This sounds like deprecated forms, deprecated router, and support for bootstrapping Angular applications with components, as you should be using NgModules instead.

This means that, if you haven’t already, you should upgrade to RC 5, and change your code that’s using deprecated features before RC 6 is released. At least there’s a migration guide for that!

The good news though is that, beyond already deprecated stuff, the Angular team plans on avoiding breaking changes after RC 5 all the way to Angular 2 final release.

This means we might be still on track for a final release in September or October max! The ng-europe conference has been announced, and is scheduled for October 25 – who knows…

Of course this email is more about learning than about news. So, here are a few resources to lean all the new functionality in Angular 2. We’ll talk about the new forms module, and the new, 3rd router.

Forms

[Video] Latest Angular 2 Forms w/ Kara Erickson

Kara is an awesome lady from the Angular team itself, who has been working on the forms module for a while.

In this video she explains many features of the new forms module, and the 2 different programming styles it offers.

There’s also a nice written summary of the talk by Juri Strumpflohner, and the source code she shows in the talk is available here.

— Thoughtram Articles

Pascal Precht, an Angular Google Developer Expert (GDE, like Microsoft MVP), has a nice collection of Angular 2 articles on his company’s site, Thoughtram.

For forms, I suggest you check the posts in this order:

  1. Template-Driven Forms
  2. Reactive / Model-Driven Forms
  3. Custom Validators
  4. Custom Form Controls

— Template-Driven or Model-Driven?

Template driven forms are similar to forms in Angular 1. They use ngModel to connect to the data object, and HTML attributes like required etc. for validations.

Reactive / model driven forms require you to build an object representing your form structure in JavaScript (of course I actually mean TypeScript) – often referred to as the form model. Don’t confuse that with ngModel. By form model here we don’t mean not the actual data object that form control values are bound to, but an object that represents the form controls, validations, hierarchy, etc.

Angular 2 provides a convenient FormBuilder object that you use to create the form model. It also allows you to create things like ControlGroup (a fieldset / nested/child form, or even the top most form) and ControlArray (which contains controls in repeats with dynamic length).

Instead of connecting to ngModel, you connect your HTML inputs to the form model object you created via formControlName. Check the above links for the code samples.

Now that you know both, how do you choose?

Here: If you worked with Angular 1 for a bit, the template-driven model will feel natural to you. I suggest you start there.

After that, learn the reactive / model-driven style, and roll on with it.

The reactive model is what feels more natural in an Angular 2 world. Everything in there is based on RXJS like many other pieces of Angular 2 – including monitoring value change and even validation. If you ask me, I’d say you should consider this like the only forms model that ships with Angular 2.

By the way, the official documentation for forms isn’t bad at all. Here it for template-driven forms, and for reactive forms.

––

Now, we should talk about the router next, and the most important / most new piece, NgModels.

But, I look at this email, and think again…

There are a lot of links in this email already, and you need some time to check the each one of them…
So, I’ll give you a chance to do just that!

Let’s talk about routing, the Angular Ahead of Time (AoT) compiler, and NgModule together tomorrow. They actually make sense together anyway, as you’ll see.

 

Till then…

Have a good day,

 


Meligy
gurustop.net
follow me on twitter

Where’s Angular 2 going after a couple of RC releases?

Note

This blog post first appeared in my Web Developer Newsletter on June 16.
Look for the form to sign up to the newsletter below.

Hello!
This is Meligy from GuruStop.NET. Just checking if you got the news, Angular 2 RC2 is out!

Here’s the official announcement – and the changelog

The big highlights for this release for me seem to be:

  • The first release of the template compiler
    It allows you to compile templates as a build step, and avoid loading the Angular compiler in runtime.
    The Angular team say this compiler is the most essential to marking Angular 2 as final release.
  • Simplifications to forms
    If you played with Angular 2 forms and find the syntax confusing / redundant like me, this is big news
  • A new rewrite of the router
    This rewrite seems better than the on in previous RC.
    The official blog says it has contributions from ui-router and ngrx/router
  • Some new features
    Namely the animation framework

By the way, I’m personally sticking to Angular CLI when trying newer versions of Angular 2.
If you are taking this route, note that you need to uninstall the CLI, and clean npm cache before installing a new version.

That’s it for me. How about you?

Have you been playing with Angular 2 yet?

Or still looking for a good place to learn it?

Write back to me and let me know :)

Cheers,

The Pre ng-conf Special — Some Great Resources for AngularJS

Note

This blog post first appeared in my Web Developer Newsletter a few hours before AngularJS ng-conf started.
Look for the form to sign up to the newsletter below.
Are you ready for ng-conf today? 
There are a lot of videos to watch, live, or as recordings in the time that suits you.
 
They are all available here:
 
 
If you’ll be watching the recording later, I expect the streams will be available as recordings of the whole day at first – via the same links; and then later in a couple of days or a couple of weeks will have separate recordings for each session with new links.
 

Another Great Angular 2 Videos

 
Also, make sure you didn’t miss the Angular team talk in early April, about HTTP and Observables, Angular CLI, and accessibility testing, and here’s the recording:
 
 
Looking for something a little bit more advanced? Check this free EggHead video on using RxJS and Redux framework (often used with React), with Angular 2:
 
 
Or if you want something more basic, check
 
 

AngularJS Performance Videos

 
If you are still doing Angular 1, check out Todd Motto’s awesome AngularJS FREE course as well:
 
 
And here’s another FREE webinar he did on the same topic
 
 

Angular 2 — RC 1

 
Finally, you probably heard it already. Angular 2 is now an RC 1 release, out of beta!
 
There are a lot of changes in RC if you are using the new router heavily.
Other than that, you need to watch for changes to pipes in beta-16, and to ngFor in beta-17.
 
Here’s the full changelog:
 

Learning Angular 2

 
If you are looking for some Angular 2 project to look at code and come up with patterns to use yourself, Dan Wahlin has a great sample, that’s already updated to Angular 2 RC 1:
 
 
If you are into different experiments with the limits of the Angular 2 API, check Ben Nadel’s recent Angular 2 blog posts:
 
 
If you are looking for a big list of different resources to learn Angular 2, check out this list:
 
 
If you are playing with Angular 2, remember that you can always email me and I can always try to help. Here are the most common gotchas people seemed to fall into in an Angular Hack Day I helped mentor in Sydney
 
 
And of course stay on this list for more AngularJS, TypeScript, NodeJS, ASP .NET, etc. goodness in future issues!
 
That’s it for this one, though.
 
Enjoy :)

– –

Mohamed Meligy

Senior Software Consultant | Readify
Organizer | ng-sydney User Group

 

P.S.
Do you have any good free resources for AngularJS, TypeScript, NodeJS, EcmaScript / JavaScript, ASP .NET, or web development in general that you’d like to share with 1,100+ members of this list?
Or, do you have a good useful product you’d like to be a sponsor of the next issue?
Just email me about it, and let’s have a chat!

A Quick 10-Min Video To Start Writing Angular 2 With No TypeScript Setup

Hello everyone,

In this video, I share a very simple tip that I earlier shared with a few Newsletter subscribers and ng-sydney members, about the easiest way you can get to play with Angular2, without worrying about shims, SystemJS, TypeScript, or RxJS.

I also give you another hint for when you want to create a “proper” project, not just a playground.

Too Long; Didn’t Read (Watch)

  • To start a new Angular2 playground, go to angular.io, scroll down to the hellow world example, and click the “TRY IN PLUNKER” button
  • If you need a proper project, just google “Minko Angular2 Seed”, click on the Angular 2 Seed Github repository, and clone that (maybe with flag --depth 1 for clean history)

Let me know if you have any questions.