Meligy’s AngularJS and Web Dev Goodies – Issue 5: More Angular 2 vs 1.3

Hello again,
Last issue was so focused on what’s going on with Angular 2.0 and how it’s going to affect Angular 1.3. In future issues I’ll assume you are business as usual with 1.3 while still interested in what the 2.0 situation is going to be like. But for now, this is going to be another Angular 1.3/2.0 heavy issue.

Please let me know if you preferred the variety in previous issues more, or whether you prefer the full focus to be on Angular. As usual, just reply to this email (my address is, or shout at me on twitter (as @Meligy).

Speaking of twitter, I’d really appreciate if you tweet about the newsletter to your friends. Here’s a pre-written example. Use a pre-written tweet by clicking here or write your own.

One last thing before we start if you are in Sydney, Australia. I’m starting a new Angular usergroup called ng-sydney. I’m still working out the logistics (venue, etc), but it seems like it’ll be great. Please RSVP to the first meetup so that I can estimate how many will show up. BTW, I’m also looking for speakers, so let me know if you’d like to speak.

AngularJS 2.0


In Issue 4 of the newsletter the write up mixed the $scope and Directive Definition Object DDO together. The writing suggested they were the same thing in the part that mentioned the removal of $scope.

This is wrong. The DDO is the object that defines the directive, the one that has the compile and link functions and restrict and scope properties. Both are going away in Angular 2.0 though in favor of EcmaScript classes and AtScript annotations (like Attributes in C#).


The links in this section are ones that really should have made it to Issue 4, except I only found them shortly after the issue went out.

All About Angular 2.0
This is THE place to learn about everything related to Angular 2.0. This is a very comprehensive article written by Rob Eisenberg (@EisenbergEffect on twitter), the creator of DurandalJS who joined the AngularJS team a few months ago (he is mainly working on the router, but also trying to influence other areas).

Video: Angular 2.0
You can think of this as the video version of the previous article. In this video Rob explains the same points in his post, and for some (including myself), it’s a bit easier to just sit and watch!


The Angular team has been trying to show up to respond to the Angular 2 panic. Most of the answers are like “ES6 is a must and it doesn’t make sense to have our own way of what it does” and “There’s no migration path because we don’t have Angular 2 yet. When we finalize what it’ll be like, we’ll work on a migration path” as I keep mentioning, but still, listen to it in their own words:

Audio: Adventures in Angular: NG 1.3 and 2.0 with Brad Green, Igor Minar, and Miško Hevery
I mentioned the Adventures in Angular podcast in Issue 1 of this newsletter. They dedicated an episode to talk to the Angular team about Angular 2.
There’s also a transcript by John Papa if you prefer to read:
The Angular Team on Angular 1.3 and the Road Ahead to Angular 2.0

Video: Angular Air Episode 0: The Angular Team on 1.3 & 2.0
This is a special first episode of yet another Angular.JS podcast, except it’s a video podcast (using Google Hangouts). You can learn more about the podcast on
Personal commentary: I don’t know what 2 podcasts would be good for, and I hate that it’s only available on YouTube because it means I can’t listen to it easily on phone (Android’s YouTube application pauses if the screen goes off), but they have a very strong start getting the Angular team in.

Different Angles…

AngularJS: The Bad Parts
This is critic of Angular 1.x, but it’s amazing if you look at it in the context of Angular 2, which solves all these problems.
Talk about dynamic scoping? Scope is going. Talk about dependency injection based on parameter name and confusing $inject property? Dependency injection is changing too. Talk about reinventing constructor methods, execution contexts and other JS concepts? This is all going away in favor of ES6 concepts (we still need to see how far the AtScript extension will go still).

This tweet also surprisingly got a little bit more traction than my usual (being a non twitter celebrity, the bar is admittedly quite low):

There’re a few other writings on Angular.JS 2.0 from well known people, but it’s all like: “Angular 2.0 is like Python 3, or is it? And is that a good or a bad thing?”, so, I just skipped these.

AngularJS 1.3

Have you heard of Angular-Hint?
Angular-Hint is a run time tool (a script you add to your page) that can tell you about anything you are doing wrong in your Angular code (via the browser console).
The tool didn’t get the attention it deserves when it was mentioned in ng-europe due to all the Angular 2 buzz, so I wrote this post in order to fix that!

AngularJS: Demystifying Directives
In a directive, does the controller function get called before or after the link function (or functions, pre and post link). Which is the best place to make changes to the HTML element? The article is a very good read even if you think you know directives pretty well

Ultimate guide to learning AngularJS in one day
From time to time, you need to refer a good tutorial to a newbie, or maybe check one yourself. Here’s what I found prior this issue.

Code School: Shaping up with Angular.js:
A new introductory course to Angular JS from Code School. They’ve kindly made it available for free.


Side note: I expect Ember to get a bit more traction coming from the Angular 2.0 panic. After all, it is the closest framework to it, and one of the 3 big frameworks IMHO: Angular, Ember, React (from Facebook).

React still a bit of a niche. It’s quite different from the usual MV* style frameworks like Angular and Ember, maybe a bit like Backbone, except its typical development involves some special .jsx files with HTML mixed with JS.

Ember feels the most natural alternative for those who decide to avoid Angular for now. It also has a great documentation and migration stories (both things it used to lack for long but now nails).

Rails JS frameworks: Ember.js vs. AngularJS
A very good Ember-Angular comparison, heavily focused on Rails and Rails tooling etc, but there’re a few good points even if you don’t use Rails.

Yahoo now uses Ember for all internal and external ads & data web apps
An interesting reddit comment spotted and shared on twitter by Tom Dale (@tomdale), the creator of EmberJS.

Ember.JS 1.8.0 And 1.9 BETA Released
A very good example of how Ember.JS manages version upgrades. Ember 1.8.0 is equivalent to 1.3.0 in Angular, except they are handling the version transition very nicely. Note the deprecation model similar to jQuery’s when deciding to change things in a major release.

The Road to Ember 2.0 RFC
Directly from Github, a “request for comments” pull request is exactly what decides what Ember.JS 2.0 is going to be like. Amazing!

Learning EmberJS

Not really a tutorial guide in itself, but good collection of resource and plan to study Ember if you consider learning it


Well, we talked about Ember, so, here’s another one for React :)
BTW, React is being used in a few areas of Facebook itself I heard, like the comments.

Reactive MVC and the Virtual DOM
Apart from learning how to get started with React, this tutorial explains the approach the framework takes to work in the first place. For example, instead of extending the DOM and writing to it, React uses the shadow DOM (think the non-modifiable :before and :after elements you use in CSS for styling) for rending its views. This is very similar to the way Web Components typically works. It has some polyfill for older browsers though (up to IE8 I think).


Open Web Platform Milestone Achieved with HTML5 Recommendation
Do you know that HTML5 as a final W3C recommendation was only published end of last month? Yes, October 28, 2014. See the HTML5 recommendation page.

5 Obsolete Features in HTML5
First, obsolete means probably not supported. This is a bit different than deprecated which means it’s not obsolete yet but will be sometime in the future.
Here’re the five: the hgroup element, the pubdate attribute on time element, the scoped attribute on style element, the command element, and the center element (the only one a few might still be using for dirty hacks). A few are actually fun to read about!

Free Books

The following are books that you can read freely online, but you are also encouraged to buy / support them if you find them useful, to help the people working on them keep the great work.

Pro Git – 2nd Edition
The 2nd edition of THE git book, the official extensive Git reference.

High Performance Browser Networking Book
This book by Ilya Grigorik, a web performance engineer and developer advocate at Google (you should follow him on twitter or G+) covers everything about networking that many web developers should know, but they probably don’t.
I suggest you take a look at the table of contents, find areas which you feel more interesting (I’m certain you’ll find a few interesting areas you didn’t know about as you thought you did) and give them a read.


I came up with this category just to put the following article into this issue. It’s the best article I have found in a while, even though it’s not about code.

How to find your passion
Behind this very simple title a GREAT article that will make you redefine what passion is, and that’s a VERY good thing. If you don’t buy into the self-help stuff, I highly recommend you make this one an exception. A must read for pretty much everyone IMHO.

More from @Meligy / GuruStop

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