Meligy’s AngularJS and Web Dev Goodies – Issue 4: ng-europe Special

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This time we have a bit of a theme around ng-Europe conference and recent Angular.JS 1.3 and 2.0 announcements.

A small warning though. This is a bit of a different issue. One that I get to be a bit more chatty at instead of just describing the links being shared. As always, I’d love to hear from you whether this style is better or worse. Reply to this email or mention me on twitter as @Meligy.


ng-europe is the European version (was held in Paris) of ng-conf 2014, the first big single-track Angular.JS conference. It took 2 days with presenters from the Angular team and community leaders. The conference is important as it’s the place where the Angular team finally explained their big plans for Angular 2.0, and a few related topics got more exposure like Angular Material Design.

Conference Notes:  Day 1  |  Day 2    (biggest announcements came out in day 2)
A wiki-style collection of notes written by conference attendees. The best place to go to for getting a summary of the conference. You can later decide which sessions you might want to watch in details.

Video: All ng-europe Videos
All the conference videos are on YouTube. Check them out. Plenty of good stuff.

ng-europe Session Slides
For times when/if you need to refer to any of the session of the session slides.

Video: ng-conf 2014 Videos & Slides
I found this while preparing the newsletter, from the same site that put the ng-europe slides together. If you are bored you can check it out. Most if not all topics are still relevant.

Angular 1.3

Angular 1.3 was announced in early October, the main focus has been speed improvement and getting some directive improvements for form manipulation. We see one-time bindings, new way to create validations and show error messages, and more. Beware though, no IE 8 support.

Official Announcement — AngularJS 1.3.0 – superluminal-nudge
The post where Angular.JS 1.3 was announced. A good summary with links to documentation for each of the new major features. There’s alway the full changelog as well.

Vide: Angular 1.3 by Jeff Cross & Brian Ford at ng-europe 2014
I thought I’d highlight this video in particular. If you have 20 minutes to spare, watch this video, a good walkthrough of the features from the team that developed them.

Angular 2.0

Angular 2.0 has been in design phase since last December, while Angular.Js 1.3 was in development as well. Since then, we knew Angular 2.0 is going to be a big change and a complete rewrite, but we didn’t know how big exactly till ng-europe.

In Angular 2.0, the team plan to use EcmaScript 6 module system to replace Angular’s own module system AND dependency injection.

They also plan to use ES 6 classes to create directives in a new way that doesn’t just replace the current directive system but also the Angular controllers. With no controller, there will be no $scope as well (they referred to $scope as “Directive Definition Object”, DDO in ng-europe).

While on it, Angular 2.0 will also get rid of jqLite in favor of using the DOM directly (since it’s designed for modern browsers, where the DOM API has evolved enough already).

RIP in AngularjsJS 2

Video: Angular 2.0 Core by Igor Minar & Tobias Bosch at ng-europe 2014
(Just highlighting the relevant ng-europe video)

The announcement of Angular 2.0 had many reactions, more negative than positive. The main issue is that Angular 2.0 as explained in ng-europe feels like an entirely different framework.

Angular 1.x (The way from 1.3 to 2.0)

The announcement of Angular 2.0 makes people very skeptical of using Angular 1.x, even with Angular 1.3 still new, having tons of great features and performance. Here are a few write ups and news that help you make an informed decision whether to use Angular 1.x or not.

New Project Lead for Angular 1.x
Igor Minar (@IgorMinar on twitter), the AngularJS team lead, has decided to assign the most active Angular.JS community member as the leader of Angular 1.x. He says that there’s a lot of work to be done in Angular 1.x and if he focuses on both releases, not much of it will happen as he’s mainly focusing on Angular 2.0. Also check Angular 1.x: The plan forward, the letter Igor wrote to the team about the change.

Angular.JS Weekly Meeting
While not specific to Angular 1.x, this seems to THE place to watch for what’s happening in the Angular 1.x space. It’s as close as we can get to what the team is thinking, at least for now.

If you watched the ng-europe videos, you might be confused about the migration path from Angular 1.x to 2.0, as it looked like there isn’t going to be any. Looking at the plans and meetings for Angular.JS team, there are a few hints that suggest things might be a bit better than expected.

For example, there is a plan to share some critical components between Angular 1.x (1.3 in fact) and 2.0. Material Design and the Angular 2.0 router are the biggest names to mention in this context. Some 3rd party libraries have similar ambition as well, like Restangular.

Screw You Angular
Although the title suggests a rant, this post is actually tries to address all the criticism AngularJS got for lack of obvious migration path from 1.x to 2.0 (I was collecting these posts for the newsletter since they had very good points, but changed my mind as the post links to them anyway).
The answer the post provides is that the team hasn’t thought about migration because Angular 2.0 doesn’t exist yet! Once v2.0 gets more shape, the team can then think what the migration path to that could look like.
Not a very bad argument, and since the author is an AngularJS insider, it’s more of a knowledge than a guess.


It seems that even EcmaScript 6 was not enough for Angular 2.0 vision of declarative programming that the team decided to implement their own language, AtScript! Crazy, huh?

It sure it. Many reject Facebook’s JavaScript framework, ReactJS, just because it introduces a new language (extension of JavaScript, .jsx files) that mixes HTML and JavaScript and requires its own compiler to translate to JavaScript. Angular.JS did something similar except the syntax isn’t as weird.

AtScript, is an extension of TypeScript that should be able to compile to ES 6 (and then can be compiled to ES 5, the current JavaScript) or Dart (I know, I don’t care too, but BTW, most of the PoCs and early experiments of Angular 2.0 and some 1.x were in Dart). It adds some annotations that the framework will use to differentiate different kinds of directives and more…


AtScript, Google’s new superset JavaScript runtime
A good article with highlights from the ng-europe session.

Video: Miško Hevery – Keynote on AtScript at ng-europe 2014
The video of day 2 keynote where AtScript was announced. Pretty fun to watch BTW.

Video: ES6 in Angular 2.0 by Erik Arvidsson at ng-europe 2014
This video explains how Google is planning to extend its ES 6 to ES 5 compiler so that it handles AtScript as well (from the user point of view). You get to see how the pieces of the puzzle come together.

AtScript Primer
The official AtScript design document.

If you are like me, you must have been quite surprised that Google has considered Microsoft’s TypeScript as a base for AtScript, here’s what Sir Anders Hejlsberg, the father of C# and TypeScript, thinks about that, in 140 letters or less:

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