Angular 1.4, Polymer 1.0, & More — Issue11 — Meligy’s AngularJS & Web Dev Goodies

Hello there,
This is Meligy from, the AngularJS and web development newsletter.

It has been quite a while since I wrote to you, and if you have been subscribed in the last month or so, this is probably the first time you read from me (previous letters).

Anyway, you probably signed up to this for some good AngularJS and web development resources / tips, and stuff, not to read this meta. So, let’s jump quick into that…


Angular 1.x

Angular 1.4 is now final

It was supposed to come in ng-conf a couple of months ago with a conservative plan announced in January, but the AngularJS team chose to polish it more and just had it ready.

They have a very good summary of what they added/moved in this blog post. They also added a separate migration document you should check for breaking changes.

– Don’t use $http’s .success()

A good tip about leaky abstractions. $http methods act like promises everywhere, except when you use their special methods.

If you call these inside a service or so, the consumer needs to check whether you return a regular promise or an http promise to check whether to use success(). Why not just treat it like any other promise!

Angular 2.0

[Video] AngularJS 2.0: Overview | Pluralsight

That’s not a PluralSight course on anything, just a free webinar available on YouTube. Have a look!

Dependency Injection in Angular 2

A very good deep dive into how DI works in Angular 2. It even shows you how to use the dependency injection framework on its own regardless of the rest of AngularJS.

– Angular 2 & NativeScript

Just in case you didn’t hear that the Angular team wants Angular 2 to run in NativeScript (which allows JS to work natively, and is associated with ReactJS typically today). This is their meeting notes document.

If I remember right, the other meeting notes documents from Angular team often keep the most recent meetings at the beginning. This one doesn’t, so the most recent meeting is at the end of the document.


JavaScript Application Architecture On The Road To 2015

Addy Osmani wrote this one at the end of 2014. In it he talks about the trends people architecting big applications and frameworks are following and why, and what problems you’d face architecting JavaScript applications today.

– We Tested How Googlebot Crawls Javascript And Here’s What We Learned

We know from late 2014 that Google started indexing JavaScript, but how good is that going? Does it solve the problem?

According to this article (the website is one of the best resources for SEO by the way), it’s mostly very impressive. You’ll still need to remember that Google is the BIGGEST but not the only crawler that might visit your site though.

Web Components

– Polymer 1.0 Released!

Polymer is Google’s framework for building independent web components (think widgets, like jQuery plug-ins or social sharing widgets, etc) that can be injecting into any website without conflicting with other content on the page. It also aims to build a big reusable component library ready for anyone to use.

While Polymer has a few similar features to AngularJS, notably data binding, it intends to be a widget framework not a whole application framework. It doesn’t offer things like routing, dependency injection, forms management, etc.

A few members of both teams said that Polymer and Angular do not have plans for merging or discontinuing one framework in favor of the other. Angular 2 aims to be able to work with any web component whether built with Polymer or not.

Tooling / IDEs

– Google Developer: TotallyToolingTips

A new article and video series about frontend tooling from Google Developers network.

The first episode is about using SublimeText for frontend, so, it’s very practical and pretty useful.

– Enhance Your JavaScript Debugging with Cross-Browser Source Maps

The article shows you how to get sourcemaps working in IE and Firefox not just Chrome. This might come handy in debugging scenarios as the world seems to shift into using other languages that translates to ES5 (the usual JavaScript) like ES6 and TypeScript.

Visual Studio

Visual Studio Code

You probably heard about Visual Studio Code already. It’s Microsoft’s SublimeText-like editor, just like Github’s own Atom editor. Actually, the word in the street is that VS Code is a fork of Atom.

Why would Microsoft do that? This doesn’t add anything, does it? It probably sounds silly to you and not worth investigating.

This is why I talk about it in here. I read all these thoughts then went and watched the video at the top of the Visual Studio Code homepage and it answered them all. There are a lot of editing and -even more- debugging experiences that are pretty inspired from the full Visual Studio. Adding these to a Sublime/Atom like editor is an awesome plus.

The features -especially debugging- are more complete for NodeJS than ASP.NET 5 (v. Next) BTW, which is funny, but at least we can be sure more ASP.NET 5 love is definitely coming.

If you are interested in VS Code, check out Johan Papa’s blog as well. He is blogging about it actively nowadays (and about ASP.NET 5 on Mac as well).

And for one or two who haven’t heard yet, you can actually get the full Visual Studio Professional edition for free as the Visual Studio Community Edition (yes, exactly as Pro) if you are alone or in a team or 5 people or less.

Publishing an ASP.NET 5 app to Docker on Linux with Visual Studio

This blog post is based on a very interesting extension Visual Studio 2015 RC Tools for Docker. The extension adds itself to the Visual Studio publish dialog seamlessly and seems to integrate very well.

Chrome Developer Tools Extensions

– Scratch JS

If you are learning ES6 and sharpening your teeth, it might help to have an extension that lets you run ES6 in the console like you do with ES5 today!


This extension makes you monitor / log all DOM changes, like added/removed elements, attribute changes, text changes, all. It’s pretty magical.

Although I admit, being a new tool that’s not already in my workflow, I just installed it a while ago, tested it with much wonder, then forgot about it until I checked my bookmarks for this newsletter. I guess I’ll be using it a bit more going forwards again!

Link Lists

Collections of resources for learning. You’ll want to skim over the list and decide if you find anything interesting. I mention the whole collection as I find so many interesting.

– Eric Elliott’s essential JavaScript links

This is a link list created by the author of the book Programming JavaScript Applications – O’Reilly Media. It has bunch articles, libraries and tools, recommendations of communities and people to follow, etc. It’s a bit random but worth skimming.

Actually, there’s an even nicer (forked) list that led me to the one above. It’s titled Eric Elliott’s essential JavaScript links or The way of the parrot, not.

The guy talked to the author of the list to prioritize the most important resources, then checked them on his own and wrote a summary of each in his forked list. He wanted to make sure he is not a parrot, recommending what he didn’t understand himself.

Check it out for the resources part especially not the libraries or so list. I could find pretty interesting learning links, and pretty basic / overly-obvious library links (like: react!).

– The New Boston

This site calls itself a social network or a forum, however, the value I see in it is a whole lot of videos in so many topics. The ones I checked for JS and MongoDB were recent and good. The site has a lot of categories to check though.

In closing…

That was it for this email. I’ll keep collecting resources and sharing them with you as I go. If you like them, share the love with your friends and tell them about the newsletter.

If you don’t like where I’m going with this, just email me or reply to this email, and let me know what can be made better.

Also, if you found some good article or tool that is a good fit for the ~600 web developers reading this newsletter, email / reply, or tweet it at me and I’ll have a look (and credit you of course).

As a bonus to this newsletter, you can also email me any problem or complex challenge that you have in you JavaScript or AngularJS application, and I’ll make sure to provide you with some good tips to get over it.

Cheers, and until next letter,

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How did I learn that?

As a bonus for coming here, I'm giving away a free newsletter for web developers that you can sign up for from here.
It's not an anything-and-everything link list. It's thoughtfully collected picks of articles and tools, that focus on Angular 2, ASP.NET 5, and other fullstack developer goodies.

  • Another awesome summary thanks for keeping me up to date!