A Video of Aaron Powell Presenting IE 11 At Sydney JavaScript UG

I haven’t been able to attend ALT.NET Sydney or SydJS last month,
as I had to follow up some family issues in Egypt on daily basis.
However, Aaron Powell ( @slace) presented at SydJS last month, and was kind enough to
record his talk on his laptop as a screencast and put it online.

The talk is about dev tools in Internet Explorer 11.
Well, yeah, I know, IE! No matter what I or you think about this browser,
we all often have to test against IE and even worse, against older versions of it too.

With compatibility modes and all, I think it’s great if newer IE versions can make
this must-have experience easier, and can prevent IE from being a source of headache.

Watch Aaron showing us how this applies to IE 11

Resharper 8.0.1 RTM, Windows 8.1 RTM and Visual Studio 2013 RC

There are some recent releases (at the time of writing) that I think many of you will be interested in.



Resharper 8.0.1

This is a bug fix update for Resharper 8. It supports pre-release Visual Studio 2013 better and also Visual Studio 2012 as usual.

Summary of fix areas:

  • Unit test runner (freezes, crashes, incorrect test status, conflicts with NUnit Test Adapter etc.)
  • Export of settings
  • Code analysis (second check expression in a double-check lock reported as always true)
  • UI (License Information dialog box, VS2008 and VS2012 integration cosmetics)
  • Internationalization (Move HTML to Resource not working)
  • Code completion (double completion lists, broken IntelliSense in projects targeting Windows 8.1)
  • Performance (mostly with unit test runner and CSS)

For the entire list of fixes, please see ReSharper 8.0.1 release notes.

Learn more at: http://blogs.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2013/09/resharper-801-is-available/



Windows 8.1 RTM (And Windows Server 2012 RTM)

Windows 8.1 RTM was meant to be held until the retail version in October, but Microsoft changed their mind and made it available for MSDN & TechNet subscribers to allow developers to test their applications on the RTN version (which has several API changes from the preview). If you have an MSDN subscription, go ahead and check your subscriber downloads.

The versions available as of now are Windows 8.1, Windows 8.1 Pro, and Windows 8.1 N. Windows 8.1 Enterprise might be available in a week or two.

Note that many Microsoft partners, you should only use MSDN downloads for VMs not real machines, and should use the Microsoft Partner Network for the real machine installs. Unfortunately the Partner Network will et Windows 8.1 by October with everyone else.

Note that Windows Server 2012 RTM is also available with the same terms, which makes its availability as a hosting OS still practically on hold for many people, btu it’ll be useful for creating test labs, etc. inside environments that consider deploying it.

You can learn more about Windows Server 2012 RTM from:




Visual Studio 2013 RC (Release Candidate)

To help with application testing in Windows 8.1 without wrapping up Visual Studio 2013 RTM too early, Microsoft has released Visual Studio 2013 RC at the same time, with a go-live license (meaning you can use it for production applications). You don’t need a special MSDN subscription to use the RC, but if you plan to develop Windows Store applications, then you really need to install it on Windows 8.1.

There are many new features in Visual Studio 2013, several were available since the previous Preview, but also many have arrived with the RC, here’s a video and complete listing of what’s new in Visual Studio 2013 Release Candidate:


Before downloading, you may want to check out the compatibility information from:


Then you can download Visual Studio 2013 RC from:


Set Visual Studio to use your default proxy & credentials to access Extension Manager & NuGet Restore


The instructions have been tested on Visual Studio 2010, 2012, 2013, and 2015.

In VS 2010, extension manager is part of a nice new generation of VS plug-in system. One of the great features of it is how it can go online talk to Microsoft Visual Studio Gallery website to retrieve list of extensions there, automatically discovering updates for installed extensions, and allowing me to add new extensions directly from within Visual Studio.

The Problem:

However, in my company I could not take benefit of that for long time. Reason is, the company uses Blue Coat proxy, with some active directory based authentication. We cannot access the Internet unless we use that proxy, no direct connection allowed, most other proxies are also blocked (by blocking the common proxies port 8080 and many other common ports).

Although I have the proxy set in Internet Explorer, and I have the username/password stored in my Windows Credentials store  (Start–> Run–> Control PanelAll Control Panel ItemsCredential Manager) -since my primary work laptop and user account on it are not part of the company domain-, Visual Studio did not seem to be able to use that.

Anything that requires online communication not directly using the browser is not working. The main feature missed by this is Extensions Manager integration with the Visual Studio Gallery online.


Another side effect of the problem was when running tests with TestDriven.NET test runner (running using Debugger or In-Process), as I had some tests that required connecting to online websites.


The Cause

It turns out (just by guessing and trial-error way) that the default proxy settings for .NET apps is for some reason not to use the system proxy and credentials. Visual Studio will be default ignore that proxy (and many other .NET applications will).


The Solution

Thanks God, .NET applications have a nice extensibility feature for things like this using the app.config file (if it was unmanaged application, I’d have no way to it).


Troubleshooting this issue in TestDriven.NET was what inspired me to get this, as I was trying to setup the credentials in the app.config file of the test project and then in Visual Studio.


So, I needed to setup the proxy settings in the Visual Studio config file., Knowing the Visual Studio IDE executable “devenv.exe”, the file I’m looking for is “devenv.exe.config”. I didn’t need to create that file (which is easy, just a standard .config file with the same name as the executable including “.exe”) because Visual Studio already has a config file with bunch of existing configuration defaults.


I want to the Visual Studio 2010 shortcut in Start-> All Programs, right clicked it, then chose “Properties”.

In the following properties Window, I clicked “Open file Location”:



This took me to the Visual Studio folder that has the “devenv.exe” and “devenv.exe.config” files:



I opened this file in Visual Studio (yes, it’s OK – the effected showed after restarting VS of course):

The section I was looking for is under “<system.net>”. The config file already had this section to enable IPv6 (which is not enabled by default, yet another interesting default and override – I commented the override anyway later).


I modified it with this simple change:



The complete XML for copy-paste sake:

As you can see, this is very simple. It enables the proxy, tells Visual Studio to use the system (IE) oroxy, and to use the default credentials for that.


This was all required to do the trick. You just need to close Visual Studio and re-run it afterwards to take effect.


Hopefully this saves someone else facing a similar issue…

Just In Case You Missed The New ASP.NET Betas (WebMatrix, Razor, IIS Express, SQL Server Compact, Web Platform Installer)

Similar to the last post, it looks like the best way to continue blogging for me is to copy private company/list emails (when appropriate of course). This is a mail I just sent to .NET list in my company, with slight modifications:

Hey all,

Just in case you have not noticed it already, early last night (before I woke up near midnight our time!) Microsoft released public betas of some new and fancy stuff…

1- IIS Express

Remember when I mentioned it before? A nice alternative to Visual Studio built-in dev server.

Supports SSL and other nice stuff, works even on Windows XP but simulates IIS 7.5, no admin privileges required

2- SQL Server Compact Edition

A file-based database engine, just like SQL Server Express, except that when you develop your website with it, you don’t need it to be installed on the server to get running (or anything else installed)

3- New ASP.NET Pages Syntax code-name Razor

This is a new syntax that is going to replace the old <% … %> ASP-Classic-like style we write ASPX/ASCX pages

It’s going to be mainly for ASP.NET MVC, but watch out, I smell like it’s may reach web-forms also

(It already now can work with or without MVC)

4- Microsoft WebMatrix
You may have heard the name before as a very old web tool for .NET 1.x,

No, this is a completely new Web development and deployment tool.

It installs all the previous components in it (but total small size 15 MB) and supports them out of the box

Also support Search Engine Optimization Kit for IIS Express and nice automatic Web Deployment model

Targeted at .NET beginners (typically coming from other dynamic languages I’d say based on what I see, it doesn’t have intellisense even, which is common in these languages IDEs)

5- Microsoft Web Platform Installer 3.0

The component you can use to install different web development stuff like the mentioned above (and like SQL Express, Visual Web Developer Express, and even PHP) and also read-applications like blog engines and such that you can sstart with and modify their source later

The announcement from Scott Guthrie that came yesterday can be found at:


For great tutorials see Scott Hanselman Post (Most Importantly, it has links to video and tutorials about all mentioned)


For feature-specific announcements from Scott Guthrie see:

· IIS Developer Express: A lightweight web-server that is simple to setup, free, works with all versions of Windows, and is compatible with the full IIS 7.5.

· SQL Server Compact Edition: A lightweight file-based database that is simple to setup, free, can be embedded within your ASP.NET applications, supports low-cost hosting environments, and enables databases to be optionally migrated to SQL Server.

· ASP.NET “Razor”: A new view-engine option for ASP.NET that enables a code-focused templating syntax optimized around HTML generation.  You can use “Razor” to easily embed VB or C# within HTML.  It’s syntax is easy to write, simple to learn, and works with any text editor.

Also, I wrote a detailed blog post on the very early morning yesterday about my thoughts of Razor syntax and ASP.NET MVC, and made sure the post is friendly to those who almost don’t know about ASP.NET MVC itself, find it here:


You know what? Let me just quote the list of videos and tutorials better…

· Channel 9 Video: WebMatrix with Scott Hunter and Simon Calvert

· Learn by Doing – WebMatrix walkthroughs

o 1 – Getting Started

o 2 – Coding with Razor Syntax

o 3 – Creating a Consistent Look

o 4 – Working with Forms

o 5 – Working with Data

o 6 – Working with Files

o 7 – Working with Images

o 8 – Working with Video

o 9 – Adding Email to your Website

o 10 – Adding Social Networking

o 11 – Analyzing Traffic on your Website

o 12 – Adding Caching for Faster Websites

o 13 – Adding Security and Membership

o 14 – Introduction to Debugging

o 15 – Customizing Site-Wide Behavior

o ASP.NET Web Pages API Reference

· WebMatrix Tutorials and FAQs

o WebMatrix Overview

o Create a Website from a Gallery Application

o WebMatrix Beta Release Readme

o Using WebMatrix Beta[Show All]

§ Download and Install an ASP.NET Application

§ Download and Install a PHP Application

§ Make your Website SEO Friendly

§ Analyze Your Website

o Using IIS Developer Express

§ IIS Developer Express Overview

§ Use the Windows System Tray to Manage Websites and Applications

§ Use the Command Line to Run a WebMatrix Site or Application

§ IIS Developer Express FAQ

o Application Gallery FAQs

§ Acquia Drupal FAQ

§ AtomSite FAQ

§ BlogEngine.NET FAQ

§ dasBlog FAQ

· File a Bug on WebMatrix or Suggest a Feature

Have Fun!


Update 01:

There is one more tutorial I forgot to mention


Open Two Exchange Accounts At The Same Time In Outlook 2010 or 2013

I just noticed this now, and it’s really GREAT.

In previous versions of Outlook, you could add multiple Exchange accounts, but it’d create different “Profile” for each of them. When you open Outlook it would force you to choose only one profile to start with., An Outlook Mail Profile could handle any number of email accounts (HTTP, POP3, …) but only one Exchange account.

Now with Outlook 2010, you can add multiple Exchange accounts also and use them at the same time.

Two Things To Note

This works great and it has no special catches at all, except:

If you are upgrading from Outlook 2007 and you have two or more Exchange accounts, Outlook 2010 will NOT merge them together

If you think about it, it sort of makes sense. Each account already sits in its own profile. There is no way that Outlook 2010 will know whether you wanted to separate the two profiles intentionally or not.

You need to add the other exchange accounts from outside outlook

You need to close Outlook and add the other Exchange account from outside it. Otherwise you’ll get this message:


Here’s What You Need:

In Control Panel, you’ll find the “Mail” item added by Outlook:


You click it and get:


You can either click “Email Accounts” to add the other Exchange account to the last profile you have in Outlook, or click “Show Profiles” to choose which profile to add the account to (probably you’ll delete the other profile after that).


Assuming we’ll add the new account to the “Outlook” profile (second in the list, oldest). We may want to select “Always use this profile” now or 1after we finish because all our accounts will be in that profile.

Now select the “Outlook” profile and click “Properties”.


This screen is very similar to the very first one. Click “Email Accounts”.


Click “New”


Choose “Manually configure….” and click “Next” (will be active once you choose Manually).


Choose “Microsoft Exchange or compatible service”, and click “Next”


This is the normal window you know for adding Exchange account. Complete it just as you did in previous Exchange accounts. finish the wizard and close all windows, then start Outlook :)

How it’s like

Of course I was wondering how it may look like to have two Exchange accounts or more in outlook, here are some examples:

Mail Folders:


Address Book




The account names are in gray which is not clear on the light blue background.

New Email


I noted that the signature used for the first account was also when switched to the second account, good.


This is where I knew about this feature:


Thanks a  lot. This feature came just in time when I needed it. Great!

Update: Another Tip: Open In New Window

If you have many folders under each Exchange account or the two are totally unrelated accounts, you “may” want to have separate views of each. You can right click the root mail folder and choose “Open in New Window” to have two Outlook windows.


In each windows you expand the account you want and collapse the other..

MSDN Code Gallery – New Code Sample Sharing Area from Microsoft

Microsoft has recently opened a new sub-site of MSDN, MSDN Code Gallery. Here’s their main statement:

Download and share sample applications, code snippets and other resources

MSDN Code Gallery is your destination for downloading sample applications and code snippets , as well as sharing your own resources.

Usually, people would go for community sites for code samples sharing, or create some open source area like CodePlex, creating projects that only work as sample base. Others would use those or the sample codes available in different MSDN dev centers from time to time for downloading code samples.
Now, we have the place for those little snippets :).

Start Downloading Code Samples and Create Your Own Right Away!